2 Shades of Grey

Songs from the soundtrack of your life


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Streaming services make charts meaningless

Streaming services like Spotify are making charts meaningless. No matter how many plays they say equals a bought track it’s not the same.

Music fans skipping through a whole album in 3 minutes is not the same as actually buying a CD or vinyl or even a download.

That’s why songs are staying in the charts so long or why one artist (the ginger busker for example) hogged all the chart places.

Not since the 1950s have songs stayed so long in the charts i.e. when  songs like “I believe” by Frankie Lane stayed at No 1 for 18 weeks or “Secret love” by Doris Day (9 weeks) and “Cara Mia” by David Whitfield (10 weeks).

Last year’s single “Despacito” stayed top for 22 weeks as did songs by the afore-mentioned Ed Sheeran, and Drake.

Of course we’ve had other long stays at No 1 when people actually bought records e.g. “Everything I do for you” by Bryan Adams in 1991, “Love is all around” by Wet, Wet, Wet in 1994, and “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen in both 1975 and 1991. But it seems that’s not going to happen again.

The chief pop and rock critic of The Times (which ran this story) said “The charts are essentially broken. They are no longer a representation of what people actually listen to“.

The way the system works makes it harder for new artists to break into the mainstream because the playlists offer up only a small sample of songs.

Streaming also has an impact on song-writing.

No more three-minute pop songs as streaming services start paying royalties after 30 seconds. So you don’t even have to play a whole song . Which explains how Ed Sheeran’s album dominated all the top 10 spots last year.

Slow build-ups are out. You have to get the hook or the song title in during the first 30 seconds. Like an executive summary so people know what to expect e.g. in Despacito

And choruses (or pre-choruses) had better get in early or, as Spotify’s head of songwriter relations says “if you’re not loving it you’re skipping it”.

An analysis of hundreds of hits over the past 30 years (published in Musicae Scientiae) found that intros averaged about 20 seconds in the mid 80s but only 5 seconds today.

So great songs from the past that wouldn’t get a look in the charts today include “Hotel California”, “Sympathy for the Devil”, Shine on you Crazy Diamond”, “Money for Nothing” and other Dire Straits songs I might add like “Telegraph Road“.

Is it the listening public’s need for instant gratification (brain-damaged by over-using smartphones) or just a commercial ploy by the streaming services. Whichever I don’t like it!